Pure Men’s Style For Men’s Fastion

If you take a look in one of your suit jackets you may notice that it has a Super grading on the label, for example Super 100s or Super 110s. Understanding this fabric labelling could mean the difference between buying a suit that lasts one year to buying a suit that lasts four years!

The International Wool Textile Organisation has coded fabric quality using the Super X description to ensure that people can make informed decisions when making purchases. The Super coding can only be used to describe fabrics made from at least 95% new wool. In some cases this wool may be mixed with other rarer fabrics such as Mohair and Cashmere as well as up to 5% of non-wool yarn.

The X value is then determined by, and must comply with, the Maximum Fibre Diameter (MFD). For example a Super 100s MFD is 18.75 microns compared to a Super 150s MFD of 16.25 microns.

Understanding this fabric labelling could mean the difference between buying a suit that lasts one year to buying a suit that lasts four years!

So what does this mean? Well, the higher the Super Grade the finer the cloth making it feel more luxurious and typically more expensive! A Super 150s is gorgeous to the touch and has an unmistakably silky look, but it also has its drawbacks. The finer the fabric, the less durable it becomes, so unless you wish to part with significant amounts of money on a regular basis, my advice would be to drop down a few grades!

I would typical recommend a Super 100s cloth from one of the established merchants such as Scabal, Holland & Sherry, and Dormeuil. For a slightly cheaper option you can try Dug dale Brothers or Lear Browne & Duns field. If after reading this article you are still tempted to push the quality boundaries then consider this.

A few months ago I had a breakfast meeting with the Global Sales Director of Holland & Sherry in their Seville Row office. After the meeting she showed me a beautiful binder that once opened revealed a single swatch of fabric and a hard back book. The book described the actual animal from which the cloth had been spun, a Vicuna (to be found in the extreme heights of the Altiplano regions of the Andes). Holland & Sherry had made enough fabric to make 18 signature Vicuna suits at a cost of 40,000 each!

This article was written by David Brooke, Managing Director of made-to-measure and bespoke tailor Mathieson & Brooke Tailors Ltd (M&BT). M&BT design and make made-to-measure suits for business and weddings. They also make made-to-measure and bespoke golf trousers. For more information please visit: Bespoke Tailor

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